The use of subcontractors by construction companies is a relatively common practice. For many companies that build homes, it could be difficult if not downright impossible to predict when new projects will come in and how many skilled workers they will need to complete things by the deadline.

As a result, instead of retaining a massive staff of employees that may be superfluous much of the year, companies often hire subcontractors to whom they have fewer obligations and responsibilities. The use of subcontractors in construction can keep the overall costs lower for both the companies and the consumers involved.

Unfortunately, subcontractors have less of a sense of obligation to the person building the home and often don’t receive very good wages. They also may not receive the right supplies or even the detailed instructions about your preferences for the work. The results of hiring subcontractors for new construction could include preventable defects in your property caused by uneducated, unskilled or rushed contractors.

Companies often hire based on the lowest bid, not performance history

Labor is one of the biggest expenses during the construction of a new building. The best and most skilled contractors often charge a premium for their services. When a construction or development company hires someone to do drywall, roofing or plumbing, their decision is far too often driven by the affordability of the quote rather than the skill of the subcontractor they consider.

After all, builders want to turn a profit on a project, so keeping costs as low as possible is good for business. Sadly, that could mean that skilled labor gets priced right out of the project. When a company hires subcontractors based on the lowest bid, the workers often have to work very fast to keep costs low.

The pressure to make a profit off newly constructed buildings could mean that you have an inexperienced professional working on a critical system in your home. The result may be defects that drastically impact the overall value of your home, as well as its comfort and livability.

New owners have rights when they discover construction defects

Realizing that there is something wrong with your brand new home is beyond frustrating. You likely paid a premium to create the home of your dreams, only to later realize that it was actually a nightmare because of bad wiring, improperly installed plumbing or a crumbling foundation.

You have a right to pursue compensation from the company that hired the subcontractor for the cost of fixing the defect, potentially as well as any secondary losses you have experienced because of that defect. Holding construction companies with questionable practices accountable for their failure to follow through on promises to you is one way to incentivize them to hire more skilled subcontractors and stop cutting corners on any future properties they build.